Eighteentwentysix’s Blog

Torbjorn Rodland

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on September 26, 2009

I saw this photograph, and my heart dropped. Definitely the most beautiful portrait of a baby I’ve ever seen, by Torbjorn Rodland.The natural lighting here is beautiful, amongst other things. (Like how soft this photo is, how his eyes shine, and how he seems to know something we don’t.)

Advertisements

Peter van Agtmael

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on June 13, 2009

Peter van Agtmael is a documentary photographer covering everything from Afghanistan and Uganda, to the war at home. I have the utter most respect for the Yale-educated photojournalist. A very honest photographer.

Amelia Earhart

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on June 8, 2009

Stumbled upon an extremely charming photograph of Amelia Earhart on ffffound and decided to look into more photos of her. Earhart is truly someone I would have loved to photograph.

7C96E6F1DB054EF381B8CE9EEBCDEADB

Safe travels, all.

Shadow Hands

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on May 26, 2009

Shadow Hands by Russ and Reyn

Shadow Hands by Russ and Reyn

Love this series by Russ and Reyn!

(via today and tomorrow)

Shorpy Photo Archive

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on May 19, 2009
"Washington, D.C., 1922. "Surgery #16." National Photo Co."

"Washington, D.C., 1922. "Surgery #16." National Photo Co."

"Miss Elinor McNeir, portrait, 1933." Elinor was a granddaughter of Julius Burrows (1837-1915), senator from Michigan. Harris & Ewing."

"Miss Elinor McNeir, portrait, 1933." Elinor was a granddaughter of Julius Burrows (1837-1915), senator from Michigan. Harris & Ewing."

"Chicago, April 1943. "Mike Evans, a welder, at the rip tracks of the Proviso Yard, Chicago & North Western R.R." 4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Jack Delano for the Office of War Information."

"Chicago, April 1943. "Mike Evans, a welder, at the rip tracks of the Proviso Yard, Chicago & North Western R.R." 4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Jack Delano for the Office of War Information."

I could spend hours on this great vintage photo archive, Shorpy. It’s full of beautiful old photographs with really interesting subjects. Each photograph has a description and you can view them large for a better look.

Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on May 19, 2009
Downtown Detroit from the series The ruins of Detroit

Downtown Detroit from the series The ruins of Detroit

Eisfabrik, Berlin from the series Eastern Germany industrial vestiges

Eisfabrik, Berlin from the series Eastern Germany industrial vestiges

Fabian Theater, Patterson from the series Forgotten theaters of America

Fabian Theater, Patterson from the series Forgotten theaters of America

Ruins are the visible symbols and landmarks of our societies
and their changes, small pieces of history in suspension.”

Three great series by Yves Marchand & Romain Meffe with a really interesting outlook on buildings and spaces that once were.


(via ffffound)

The Family Dig

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on May 15, 2009
Mom Wrapped In Afghan by Ben Alper

Mom Wrapped In Afghan by Ben Alper

One of the main reasons I want so badly to move back to New York is to be able to photograph my family all the time, not just during the summer and some holidays. I believe that as a photographer your family is so important to capture, no matter how you feel about them. Ben Alper‘s The Family Dig is a good example of this.

(via ahorn magazine)

Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on May 4, 2009
photographs and writing by Sophie Callie

photographs and writing by Sophie Callie

This Saturday I paid a visit to the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Art, and I really enjoyed myself! Here are some photographers I loved.

The first set that caught my eye was by a French photographer, writer, conceptual, and installation artist, Sophie Callie. The piece was a set of two photographs with a writing below. In the exhibit, the writing was sewn onto a large piece of fabric. The first in these two was one of the two I saw at the museum. Really beautiful, full of emotion.

The next photographer is Alessandra Sanguinetti, a magnum photographer who only photographs in Argentina.

In 1999, Alessandra Sanguinetti began working on a series of photographs which register the saga of two young cousins named Guille and Belinda, then nine and ten years old. Cultivating an intimate relationship with the pair over the past five years, Sanguinetti collaborates with the girls to construct images fueled by the dreams, fantasies, and fears that accompany the psychological and physical transition from childhood to adulthood.

"In 1999, Alessandra Sanguinetti began working on a series of photographs which register the saga of two young cousins named Guille and Belinda, then nine and ten years old. Cultivating an intimate relationship with the pair over the past five years, Sanguinetti collaborates with the girls to construct images fueled by the dreams, fantasies, and fears that accompany the psychological and physical transition from childhood to adulthood."

The next photograph is by a Massachusettes artist, Jack Pierson.

“Pierson has made a name for himself with a body of work that includes photographs, collages, word sculptures, installations, drawings and artists books. His “Self-Portrait” series was shown in the 2004 Whitney Biennial and his works are collected by major museums worldwide.”

I really enjoyed this photo from the “Self-Portrait” series.

Self Portrait No. 4 By Jack Pierson

Self Portrait No. 4 By Jack Pierson

Last, but certainly not least, I’d like to leave you with a photo by a very talented photographer, Samantha Salzinger. Samantha is both FIU and Yale educated, and she is my photography professor. These photographs are truly unique.

“These photographs explore themes of reality and fiction utilizing the mechanism of the diorama, creating hand-built miniatures of the landscape and catastrophic events of nature. The photographs begin with a 4 x 5″ traditional view camera, creating transparencies that are then digitally scanned and manipulated. Through this process I am interested in investigating the human desire to control and predict nature. As the images romanticize nature as untouched and uncontrollable, the irony is that what you see is entirely synthetic and created by human hands.”

Bermuda Triangle, 2008 By Samantha Salzinger

Bermuda Triangle, 2008 By Samantha Salzinger

Immersion Project

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on April 30, 2009

Photograph by Robbie Cooper

“Robbie Cooper’s compelling portraits of adolescents playing video games, which appeared last November in The New York Times Magazine, are part of an ambitious and unusual project called Immersion. A former photojournalist, Cooper plans to film hundreds of adults and children as they immerse themselves in movies, TV programs and video games.”

I find this project really interesting and yes, a bit humorous. The photos are taken from the television or computer screen they are playing or watching from, which makes the facial expressions extrememly genuine.

More at robbiecooper.org

(via pdn)

Requiem for a City

Posted in Uncategorized by eighteentwentysix on April 30, 2009
Photograph by Jose Moreno

Photograph by Jose Moreno

“Once a thriving industrial hub, Camden, New Jersey, now ranks among the poorest, most dilapidated, and most dangerous cities in America.

Photographer Jose Moreno spends quite a bit of time there covering mostly bad news for the Cherry Hill Courier Post. But what he notices— beyond the prostitutes and drug dealers—is the ghost of Camden’s mid-20th century glory days, the beauty of its rundown architecture, and occasional signs of hope and renewal. He captures all of that in an offbeat slideshow called “Camden: An Architectural View.”

View slideshow at courier post online

(via pdn)